Onward Knits Book Launch!

I am very excited to announce the release of my first book: Onward Knits: Knitting patterns inspired by the Wellington Railway Station.

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FO: Hermione Everyday Socks

You know when you really want something to be finished, so you rush it and make mistakes and it ends up taking even longer? That’s the story of my second Hermione Every Sock. I had to redo the heel-flap because I hadn’t divided the stitches evenly across the two needles – but not before I’d redone the heel decreases three times because I couldn’t work out what was wrong. Then I had to redo the gusset. And the toe graft and several rows there.

All because I just wanted to be finished, so I could move onto the next pair of my August Sockathon. Maybe I shouldn’t do challenge knitting. Continue reading

FOs: Bracken Beanies

I’ve always considered myself rather lucky to share hobbies with both of my parents. It’s nice to have something to talk to your parents about that’s not, well, just you and them.

In the case of my Mum, it’s knitting (and sewing and gardening, but that’s for another time). It’s only in the past couple of years, though, that we’ve started to do knitalongs (KAL). Our most recent KAL: Bracken Beanie! Continue reading

Kākā Hap

This blog post has been a long time in the making! It started when Kat visited from America and broke my cold-sheeping resolution. I progressed through my hap fairly quickly (helped by by a few sick days) and I’ve already posted about the challenges I encountered here. Kat, however, had to contend with moving cities and sticky hot weather back in America and, understandably, took a while to finish hers. Check out Kat’s beautiful version here – I love her kingfisher colourway!

I also took forever to photograph mine. Fortuntely my family were in town last weekend and my sister took photos for me on a trip to Zealandia – where there were plenty of kākā, the birds that inspired my colourway!

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Me and a kākā, the bird who’s colours I used for my Nut Hap © Emma Hill

Having a lag between finishing a project and blogging about it does have a certain advantage. I know what it’s like to wear now and this is not a hap that one wears lightly – and I mean that in both senses of the word.

There’s 700g of yarn in this scarf. I made the hap longer to ensure I got the same look as the original, but even if I hadn’t, it would still be a lot of yarn. That’s a fair amount of weight to be carrying around.

It’s also a weighty visual statement. I’ve had a couple of people comment that it reminds them of religious or academic robes. It doesn’t really go with a lot in my wardrobe and it’s enough of a statement that it needs a fairly simple outfit.

That said, it’s an incredibly comforting scarf to wear. The length means it can be wrapped around three times, keeping out even gale force winds (ask me know I know that one!) And I constantly finding myself tucking my fingertips into the open ends of the tucks, an oddly soothing act.

Anyway, enough jibberjabber, here’s the photos!

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The full length in all its clerical glory © Emma Hill

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© Emma Hill

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© Emma Hill

{free pattern} Puppy Santa Hat


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A quick knit using left over yarn, the Puppy Santa Hat is the perfect prop for Christmas photos or a present for a dog-lover. The brim and pom pom are made in 8ply yarn, giving them a bit of bulk, while the body of the hat is knit in 4ply, allowing the hat to flop nicely. Easily adapted to any size of dog.

My gorgeous model for the hat is Jock, a Cairn terrier who belongs to the friends I’m staying with in Melbourne. He (and my friends) have been lovely during my job hunt phase – Jock’s always ready to play or be cuddled when no one’s called me back!

Puppy Santa Hat

{knitting pattern} Perfect Fit Tea Cosy

Many tea cosy patterns are made for one size of tea pot – generally large, eight cups at least. But teapots come in many sizes and shapes (just like people!), so this tea cosy pattern is designed to adapt to nearly any tea pot. Take the two tea pots below – one short and fat, the other tall and blocky.

Both are a little too small for the average tea cosy pattern, being 2-3 cup pots. But the Perfect Fit Tea Cosy pattern is easily adapted to both.

The ribbing stretches to accommodate wider areas, while also pulling the tea cosy in where needed, ensuring a snug fit.

The pattern includes a calculation to create a Perfect Fit Tea Cosy and detailed photos to help you along with the pattern. The pattern is written for 8-ply yarn, but there is advice on how to easily adapt the pattern for another ply.

The Perfect Fit Tea Cosy pattern is available for US$3, simply click on the button below.